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GM to recall more than 200,000 cars due to brake problem

In a prior post, we highlighted the fact that there have been more recalls so far in 2014 than there had been for the entire year of 2013. It appears that the recalls will keep coming; especially from General Motors, who promised a revamped effort to root out and address defects.

For those who may not have followed this blog, General Motors has been embroiled in the largest recall (and civil penalty) for an American automaker stemming from an ignition switch issue that could cause cars to stall unexpectedly. The problem could also cause airbags and power steering modules to malfunction. More than 2 million vehicles were recalled to address the problem, and General Motors paid a $35 million fine for its transgressions.

Fast forward to September 2014, and GM has issued recalls for the Cadillac XTS and the Chevorlet Impala. Both recalls involve in 2014 and 2015 model years. The problem stems from a potential parking brake defect, where the brake may not completely disengage when the driver releases it. The brake pad may continue to grind against the rotor as the car moves, creating friction and excessive heat.

The heat could also lead to a fire, which could put the driver and any passengers at significant risk of harm. As such, GM will recall more than 200,000 Cadillacs and Impalas sold in the United States and Canada over the last two years.

It remains to be seen whether other recalls will be issued on these vehicles. In the meantime, GM reports that no accidents or injuries have occurred because of the defect. 

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