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The dangers of taking selfies while driving

It should be obvious that taking selfies while driving is inherently dangerous. After all, the act of posing for a picture, pushing a button on a smartphone, and posting it onto Facebook takes a certain amount of focus. If a driver is doing this while they are behind the wheel, it is more than likely that he or she is not focusing on the road.

This can put the driver (and any passengers) in serious danger as well as the driving public. Despite this danger, an increasing number of people are taking selfies while driving. The growing number of conspicuous hashtags are indicative of the trend, including: #drivingtowork, #drivingfast, #morningcommute, and #drivingintherain.

Although there are no current statistics detailing how many people have been harmed in accidents involving selfies, but the danger is clear.

If a driver is using a cell phone while behind the wheel, it could be considered a breach of the duty to use reasonable care while driving. Moreover, if the cell phone use is found to be the proximate cause of a car accident, the offending driver could be held liable for the crash. This could allow the injured party to seek compensation from the driver for their pain and suffering, medical expenses, lost wages (if any) as well as any property damage.

With younger drivers relying on social media to maintain relationships, they are more likely to check their Twitter and Facebook accounts while driving. If you have been involved in an accident with a suspected distracted driver, contact an experienced personal injury attorney. 

The preceding is not legal advice.

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