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Why teen drivers should be concerned about graduation season

For many teens and young adults, graduation is probably the most exciting time of their lives. It is a chance to celebrate all the hard work they have put in to get to this point, and to be optimistic about their futures. You would be hard pressed to find a graduating teen or young adult who doesn’t want to party during this time of year. Because of this, May and June can be a deadly time for young drivers.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, car accidents are the leading cause of death for young people aged 15 to 20. So in the midst of celebrating their accomplishments, young drivers should take the following recommendations to heart. 

Don’t drink and drive – Indeed, it should be obvious that drinking and driving is a bad idea. However, there are countless young drivers who may believe that one must be sloppy drunk and uncoordinated before it is not safe for them to drive. But just like the commercial says, “buzzed driving is drunk driving.”

Stay off the phone – It is also common for young drivers to stay in touch using their cell phones. Many spend more time sending texts than actually talking to someone using their own voices. But trying to hold a text conversation while driving is very dangerous. Whatever is being communicated by text, it is not worth losing your life over.

Obey the speed laws – In many accidents involving young drivers, excessive speed is a contributing factor. So while your reflexes may be great and allow you to make split second moves at high speeds, a wrong decision could be fatal.

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