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July 2014 Archives

High court rules legal status does not affect workers comp

Immigration issues are a hot-button topic around the country, and the highest court in Pennsylvania has weighed in on the subject of immigration as it relates to workers compensation benefits. The ruling concerns a claim filed after a South American immigrant filed for benefits following a workplace accident in July 2008.

What to do after a car accident

Being in an accident can be a jarring event. There is nothing really that can prepare you for such an event, but there are several things that can be done to protect your legal rights after an accident. Depending on the severity of the crash, the helpful tips set forth in this post can set the foundation for what an attorney will need to advance your claim or defend you as needed. 

Temp worker's death prompts scrutiny

A Pennsylvania temp worker was killed in a sugar plant accident in February 2013 in Fairless Hills. The man was breaking up clumps in a sugar hopper when he slid into it and was killed by suffocation. The sugar plant had initially had a safety screen in the hopper, but it was removed 13 days before the accident because the manager at the plant believed that it was slowing production.

Subaru recalls more than 600,000 vehicles to correct defects

The summer of 2014 has been consumed with news about auto recalls. General Motors has been at the center of this news, with millions of cars recalled because of ignition switch concerns. The embattled automaker has even gone as far as taking out full page ads in newspapers advising consumers to use a single key in the ignition as a protective measure. Other GM recalls concern headlamp malfunctions and steering column issues.

Subaru recalls more than 600,000 cars to correct defects

The summer of 2014 has been consumed with news about auto recalls. General Motors has been at the center of this news, with millions of cars recalled because of ignition switch concerns. The embattled automaker has even gone as far as taking out full page ads in newspapers advising consumers to use a single key in the ignition as a protective measure. Other GM recalls concern headlamp malfunctions and steering column issues.

Pennsylvania workers injured in several recent accidents

Workplace safety, particularly at construction sites, has become a major issue of concern for many workers in the Pittsburgh area. Two separate accidents, one at a hotel construction site and another at a moving company, involved a scaffolding fall. A majority of workplace accidents in the area were due to falls or being struck by moving vehicles or equipment. Recent fatal accidents have been due to electric shock or accidental pinning.

Tracy Morgan and injured friends sue Wal-Mart for negligence

Former “30 Rock” and “Saturday Night Live” star Tracy Morgan has been released from the rehabilitative center where he had been recovering after spending several weeks in a New Jersey hospital. Morgan was seriously injured in the midst of a crash with a semi-truck owned by Wal-Mart.

Why auto recalls can be helpful to consumers

News of General Motors’ numerous recalls have probably fallen on deaf ears by now. After all, what began as a relatively small recall of Chevy Cobalts for ignition switch issues has ballooned into the most active recall of 2014. Other recalls include faulty windshield wipers, problems with headlights as well as issues with airbags. In fact, GM has recalled more cars and trucks through June of 2014 than it had in all of 2013.

Worker killed in explosion at GM facility

One worker was killed and eight others were hospitalized after an explosion that occurred in a General Motors plant on July 2. Quaker Chemical Corp., a Pennsylvania-based chemical manufacturer that provides contract services at the plant, announced that the decedent was one of its employees. The incident occurred at the company's metal-stamping facility near Fort Wayne, Indiana at approximately 1:50 p.m. According to the news source, a spokesperson for the automaker sent out an e-mail stating that a member of a contract team was killed by a 'small chemical explosion."

2012 statistics point to the 5 most dangerous jobs

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 3.2 workers out of 100,000 died in workplace accidents in 2012. This means that there were 4,628 fatalities across all occupations that year, which is on the low end of the yearly average 4,500 to 6,500. Some workers in Pennsylvania may be surprised to find that they have jobs in industries with the highest fatality rates. The fifth deadliest job is that of a fisherman or other sea-based worker. They have a fatality rate of 117 workers in 100,000, with 32 fatalities in 2012. Most of these deaths occurred during vessel disasters. In the aircraft industry, which is the fourth most dangerous, 71 engineers, co-pilots and pilots died due to plane crashes and equipment failures. This type of job has a fatality rate of 53.4 workers in 100,000. Construction workers have the third most dangerous jobs, with 210 deaths in 2012. With a death rate of 17.4 workers in 100,000, the most common causes are falls, trips and slips. With only a few more deaths that same year, agricultural managers and farmers have the second deadliest jobs. The fatality rate for the agricultural industry is 21.3 workers in 100,000 due to roadway and equipment accidents. The most dangerous job, however, is driving a truck. Driving a truck, whether it is a semi or a light delivery truck, is the most dangerous by far. In 2012, 741 people in this occupation lost their lives, and the death rate is 22.1 people in 100,000. In Pennsylvania, workers' compensation may cover workers who are injured on the job. State laws require all employers to provide some type of coverage to their employees, whether it is workers' compensation, self-insurance or some other method. The insurance could provide wage-loss, medical care and disfigurement benefits to injured workers. Additionally, the dependents of workers who die on the job may receive death benefits. Source: Pennsylvania Department of Labor & Industry, 'About Workers' Compensation"

The perils of riding bicycles in New Jersey metro areas

Summer seems to be the ideal time for people to be on bikes. The weather is great, traffic appears to be lighter (because more motorcycles are on the road) and the exercise that comes with riding a bike is good for a person’s health. Nevertheless, riding a bike in the city comes with a unique set of dangers that are not always accounted for. Even with the latest safety advancements, bicyclists are still at risk.

Motorcycle riders should be careful during the Fourth

This weekend, scores of people who ride motorcycles will be on the road travelling throughout Pennsylvania. The weather is ideal, and the celebrations for the height of the summer are bound to bring more people out than usual. As a matter of fact, AAA estimates that more than 40 million Americans across the country will be on the road. Because of this, the likelihood of accidents increases.

Safe driving tips for the Fourth of July holiday weekend

The Independence Day holiday weekend is the second major summer holiday (with Labor Day being the third). Next weekend, millions of Americans will take to highways to travel to destinations for the long weekend. While gas prices are likely to remain unseasonably high, it is not expected to deter people from travelling. After all, with joblessness rates being at their lowest since 2007, more people are expected to take on a bit of debt to enjoy the holiday.

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