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Pennsylvania man survives work-related chainsaw accident

A professional tree cutter was removing a tree when the chainsaw he was using struck his shoulder and embedded itself in his neck. He had been attempting to cut around power lines at the time of the accident.

A co-worker assisted the man until EMTs arrived on the scene. Although the injured man was able to turn off the machine, paramedics still had to dislodge the motor from the chainsaw. A medical team later remove to remove the blade and chain from the man's body.

Luckily, the blade managed to miss a main artery, albeit barely. In fact, according to the doctor, had the chainsaw moved even slightly, the man may not have survived. Ironically, the stuck blade probably helped spare him. Treating physicians were able to treat the injury, and the man is now recovering in a local hospital.

Having an accident on the job is not an uncommon occurrence. Depending on the degree of injury, the aftermath of a workplace accident can mean lost wages and diminished quality of life. In the most severe cases, it could even lead to death. In this instance, the employee is extremely fortunate to have survived.

In Pennsylvania, when a person is injured in a workplace accident, that person could be entitled to workers' compensation benefits. Workers' compensation should pay for all medical costs as well as paying for missed days of work. After a work-related injury is suffered, workers' comp claims should be filed as soon as possible. It may also be a good idea to consult with an attorney about other claims that can be pursued.

Source: KARE, "Pa. tree service worker survives chainsaw accident", April 01, 2014

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